Shopping Cart
orderInCart>>>>

Please wait while we fetch your location...

Marine Raider Battery Switch

Marine Raider Battery Switch is rated 1.8 out of 5 by 5.
  • y_2017, m_3, d_20, h_22
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_1.0.0
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_5
  • loc_en_US, sid_201400286, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_academy
  • bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-3.1.1
  • CLOUD, getAggregateRating, 66ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT
SKU: 023774607 Item: 51035
Marine Raider The Marine Raider Battery Switch is red with a silver panel and features a universal design. Marine Raider Battery Switch
023774607 29.99 USD

$29.99

Select Color: Multi

Out of Stock Online

Great for any avid boating enthusiast, the Marine Raider Battery Switch is made for use with 2 batteries and features a universal design. The battery switch is red with a silver panel and is made of high-impact plastic with 3/8", copper-plated cable lugs for durability.

Features and Benefits
  • Universal battery switch for 2 batteries
  • 3/8" cable lugs
  • Made of high-impact plastic with copper-plated cable lugs for durability
  • Red with a silver panel
Important Product and Safety Information
  • Proposition 65 warning for California residents: WARNING - This product contains one or more chemicals known to the State of California to cause cancer and birth defects or other reproductive harm.
Specifications
  • Accessory Color: Red, silver
What's in the Box
  • Marine Raider Battery Switch
Rated 1 out of 5 by from dont buy i bought and installed to replace my perko brand that was 15 yrs old and had a stripped stud. this one worked for about 2 weekends out then started making popping noise out of radio and brand new battery would be dead overnight which it has never done before. I ordered a perko and no problems since. spend the extra the first go around and save some hassle for yourself
Date published: 2015-08-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Very Poor Quality I bought one of these to put in a forklift as a battery isolator. I am familiar with "Perko" Brand Battery switches that look just like this and work great so I bought this switch with confidence. I installed the switch and the forklift wouldn't start, not even a click. I checked for continuity and one of the options was faulty so I bought another one thinking I got a dud. I installed switch #2 and the same thing happened, nothing. I then checked for continuity and found it was iffy, sometimes it would have continuity and other times it wouldn't. After messing with it I think these are made to handle maybe... MAYBE 50 amps of power, if that. The quality is just horrible. Please save yourself the headache and go with a known brand like "Perko". I am into car audio so I ended up just buying a 200 amp Rockford Fosgate Circuit Breaker and haven't had a problem since.
Date published: 2015-06-11
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Battery switch I bought this for my bay boat I installed it when I tried to switch from to the battery the switch would stick . Then I could only get powere from 1 battery switched it back to the other battery then it stopped working altogether The switch never worked . I am so glad that I never used the out on the water . I was rewiring my boat and this was the last part..
Date published: 2015-02-22
Rated 5 out of 5 by from Great Replacement For My Old Broken Swithc Replaced another battery switch made by another manufacturer that broke. I am glad I didn't spend the extra money for the fancy brand name one sold at other stores. This Marine Raider unit is solid and does a great job. I have my battery switch mounted inside the center console on my boat and have no problems with it yet this season. Thanks for the great product.
Date published: 2014-04-29
Rated 1 out of 5 by from Very poorly made I bought this switch 2 days ago. When I installed it today, I realized it wasn't working at all. Set my meter for continuity to verify and sure enough, no matter what position it was in, Nothing. Assuming I just happened to get a bad one, I went to Academy to exchange. The first one I picked up off the rack was already broken too. Switch would not go to "2" Just off, 1, and all. second one I pulled off the rack had something loose inside and rattled. This made me decide to go with the more expensive unit instead. It was installed in a few minutes and working great. Save yourself the hassle and spend the extra $10. It's not worth it to end up stranded and rewiring your boat in the middle of the gulf or lake...
Date published: 2013-09-20
  • y_2017, m_3, d_20, h_22
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvrr, vn_bulk_1.0.0
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasreviews, tv_0, tr_5
  • loc_en_US, sid_201400286, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_academy
  • bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-3.1.1
  • CLOUD, getReviews, 0ms
  • REVIEWS, PRODUCT

Is there a wiring schematic for this product? If there is one, how do I get it. I just want to make sure I wire it up correctly.

Asked by: Gasp
Hello Gasp, Currently we do not have a wiring diagram to post for Marine Raider Battery Switch.I have provided the below basic instructions to better assist you. Step 1: Find a location for the switch. Keep in mind that the cables will run between the batteries, the switch, the engine, and any distribution panels or fuse boxes and that they should be as short as possible. The switch should also be protected from spray and curious guests, yet still be within the operator's easy reach. Step 2: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and the batteries. You'll need to run two positive cables (one for each battery or battery bank) to the switch. Step 3: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 4: Secure the cable lugs to the input terminals of the battery switch. The typical battery switch has three terminals: two battery input terminals and one output terminal. Step 5: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and your boat's engine and electrical systems, depending on the complexity of your boat's wiring. You may only need to run a cable to your engine's starter motor solenoid, or you may need to run one to your fuse or distribution panel as well. Step 6: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 7: Secure the cables to the output terminal of the battery switch. Mount the battery switch using mounting screws. Secure the cables to the engine's starter motor solenoid and distribution panel. Step 8: Switch the battery to "off." Attach the negative terminals of the batteries to the boat's ground; for example, one cable running to the engine block and another to the negative wire coming from the distribution panel. Again, make sure the cables are properly sized, crimped and secured. Step 9: Finally, you are ready to attach the cables to the positive battery terminals. Before taking this final step, however, consider installing fuses between the positive battery terminals and the cables that run to your new battery switch. High amperage fuses are now available at reasonable prices. They will protect your wiring while still allowing you to draw enough current to start your engine.
Answered by: KenetraU
Date published: 2017-03-15

If I have the switch on 1 will both batteries be charged while running?

Asked by: BoaterBob
Hello BoaterBob, For safety and optimum performance of this product, adhere to the manufacturers recommended usage guide.
Answered by: khodges
Date published: 2016-09-14

Why doesn't this switch come with a simple diagram to insure a correct hookup. 

Asked by: flyer 222
Hi flyer 222, We do not have a wiring diagram to post for Marine Raider Battery Switch currently. Please contact your local Academy Sports + Outdoors store directly or our Customer Service Center at (888) 922-2336 for further help.
Answered by: Tpayne2
Date published: 2015-05-27

a diagram showing how to hook it up?

Asked by: ted jarriel
Hello ted jarriel, I have provided the below basic instructions to better assist you. Step 1: Find a location for the switch. Keep in mind that the cables will run between the batteries, the switch, the engine, and any distribution panels or fuse boxes and that they should be as short as possible. The switch should also be protected from spray and curious guests, yet still be within the operator's easy reach. Step 2: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and the batteries. You'll need to run two positive cables (one for each battery or battery bank) to the switch. Step 3: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 4: Secure the cable lugs to the input terminals of the battery switch. The typical battery switch has three terminals: two battery input terminals and one output terminal. Step 5: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and your boat's engine and electrical systems, depending on the complexity of your boat's wiring. You may only need to run a cable to your engine's starter motor solenoid, or you may need to run one to your fuse or distribution panel as well. Step 6: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 7: Secure the cables to the output terminal of the battery switch. Mount the battery switch using mounting screws. Secure the cables to the engine's starter motor solenoid and distribution panel. Step 8: Switch the battery to "off." Attach the negative terminals of the batteries to the boat's ground; for example, one cable running to the engine block and another to the negative wire coming from the distribution panel. Again, make sure the cables are properly sized, crimped and secured. Step 9: Finally, you are ready to attach the cables to the positive battery terminals. Before taking this final step, however, consider installing fuses between the positive battery terminals and the cables that run to your new battery switch. High amperage fuses are now available at reasonable prices. They will protect your wiring while still allowing you to draw enough current to start your engine.
Answered by: Tpayne2
Date published: 2015-05-27

Is this switch a "make before break" connection?

Asked by: Texas Two Guns
Hi Texas Two Guns, As the Marine Raider Battery Switch switches from 2 to ALL to 1, it in effect does establish a “make before break” connection, although it was not originally designed as such.
Answered by: MGMay
Date published: 2015-01-31

need a wiring diagram to hook 2 batteries to the perko switch.

Asked by: captjohn
Hello captjohn, I have provided the below basic instructions to better assist you. Step 1: Find a location for the switch. Keep in mind that the cables will run between the batteries, the switch, the engine, and any distribution panels or fuse boxes and that they should be as short as possible. The switch should also be protected from spray and curious guests, yet still be within the operator's easy reach. Step 2: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and the batteries. You'll need to run two positive cables (one for each battery or battery bank) to the switch. Step 3: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 4: Secure the cable lugs to the input terminals of the battery switch. The typical battery switch has three terminals: two battery input terminals and one output terminal. Step 5: Determine where to run the cables between the switch and your boat's engine and electrical systems, depending on the complexity of your boat's wiring. You may only need to run a cable to your engine's starter motor solenoid, or you may need to run one to your fuse or distribution panel as well. Step 6: Lay the cables in place and cut them to length, one at a time. Strip about 1/2 inch of insulation from the ends of cables and slip on the proper-size cable lugs. Crimp the lugs. Step 7: Secure the cables to the output terminal of the battery switch. Mount the battery switch using mounting screws. Secure the cables to the engine's starter motor solenoid and distribution panel. Step 8: Switch the battery to "off." Attach the negative terminals of the batteries to the boat's ground; for example, one cable running to the engine block and another to the negative wire coming from the distribution panel. Again, make sure the cables are properly sized, crimped and secured. Step 9: Finally, you are ready to attach the cables to the positive battery terminals. Before taking this final step, however, consider installing fuses between the positive battery terminals and the cables that run to your new battery switch. High amperage fuses are now available at reasonable prices. They will protect your wiring while still allowing you to draw enough current to start your engine.
Answered by: Johanna
Date published: 2014-06-23
  • y_2017, m_3, d_20, h_18CST
  • bvseo_bulk, prod_bvqa, vn_bulk_1.0.0
  • cp_1, bvpage1
  • co_hasquestionsanswers, tq_6
  • loc_en_US, sid_201400286, prod, sort_[SortEntry(order=SUBMISSION_TIME, direction=DESCENDING)]
  • clientName_academy
  • bvseo_sdk, java_sdk, bvseo-3.1.1
  • CLOUD, getContent, 113ms
  • QUESTIONS, PRODUCT
Back to Top